Keep Your Parts Moving – Orthopedics and Heart Health

Orthopedic Health

Every day, advances are being made in the world of orthopedic health and disease treatment for our bones, muscles, tendons, ligaments, and related connective tissues.

Reduction in the crippling pain of arthritis and the advances of knee and hip replacements from musculoskeletal research is changing how well and how long we can live active, healthier lives.

Sports | Keep Your Parts Moving

The human body has more than 200 bones and more than 200 joints that connect the bones.

Until something goes wrong with one or more them, most people take their bones and joints for granted.

Almost half a million hips or knee replacements occur in the United States each year; in fact, many of the diseases related to joints and bone problems affect women and minorities more severely.

Consider these facts:

  • The most common joint problems come from arthritis and injuries. Arthritis literally means joint inflammation. Although joint inflammation describes a symptom or sign rather than a specific diagnosis, the term “arthritis” often refers to any disorder affecting the joints.

    These disorders fall within the broader category known as rheumatic diseases, of which there are more than 100 kinds, and are characterized by inflammation as well as loss of function of one or more connecting or supporting structures of the body.

  • More than 46 million people in the United States have arthritis or other rheumatic conditions. By the year 2020, this number is expected to reach 60 million.

    These diseases more frequently limit activity than do heart disease, cancer, or diabetes.

  • The most common form of arthritis is osteoarthritis. It is seen especially among older people and is sometimes called degenerative joint disease.

    In osteoarthritis, the surface layer of cartilage (the hard but slippery tissue that covers the ends of bones) breaks down and wears away, causing pain, swelling, and loss of joint motion.

  • About 435,000 Americans have a hip or knee replaced each year. Because of its structure and weight-bearing capacity, the knee is the most commonly injured joint.

    In the case of hip joint damage, osteoarthritis is the most common cause.

  • Young adults who have had a previous joint injury are more likely to develop osteoarthritis.

Prevention

Regular exercise, a balanced diet, and a healthful weight can help you reduce your risk of developing osteoarthritis, especially in the hips and knees, or suffering sports injuries.

Exercise helps bone density, improves muscle strength and joint flexibility, and enhances your balance. Take part in regular walking, strength training, swimming, dancing, tai chi, gardening, and similar low-impact activities.

A bone-healthy diet should be rich in calcium and Vitamin D. Check to see if your favorite foods are fortified, and consider taking a daily vitamin or mineral supplement. Several medications are available to prevent osteoporosis.

Ask your orthopedic surgeon which medications can best help you minimize additional bone loss and reduce your risk for fractures.

If you believe you are suffering from arthritis, knee or hip-related injury and need specialized orthopedic care, the surgeons at Orthopedic Specialists of Seattle provide excellent treatment options available for you.

Summer Running

As runners, think about the varied terrain and urban obstacles of jogging outdoors versus the treadmill’s regularity; now apply that same comparison to every gym exercise and the variables of their outdoor equivalents, from biking in the park to soccer on the grass.

Here are three important steps you should take to ensure that getting back into running leaves you free from injury this summer:

  1. Take a moment to set a goal. Setting a goal helps propel yourself towards a specific aim, a simple enough idea which cannot be overstated in its power to focus yourself on a reasonable achievement.
  2. Renew one of your new year’s resolutions or challenge yourself to meet or beat a pace that you haven’t quite kept up with over the past few years.
  3. More importantly, set up a log book to keep track of your times and achievements. Having a physical record of where you started with a means to your ends is paramount to meeting your goal.

Speaking of physical reminders, the change in season is the perfect opportunity to change your sneakers! Most dedicated running stores offer in-depth analyses of your feet and gait to make sure that you get the proper equipment. Think about marking your shoes with the date of purchase so you can keep tabs on when you got them so that you don’t keep using them after their time is up.

Dr. Mark Reed states, “With so many different running styles gaining popularity; selecting the shoe that fits your style is important. A properly fitted shoe will help protect against injury and may also enhance performance. “

You should also set up an appointment with your OSS physician to go over all the requisites, making sure to get the OK for the goals you’ve set for yourself before the start of new routines.

The simple act of updating your equipment and evaluating your physiology are powerful motivators for getting back in shape and keeping you injury-free.

If you believe you are suffering from a running-related injury and need specialized orthopedic care, Orthopedic Specialists of Seattle provides excellent treatment options available for you. Please feel free to contact OSS at (206) 633-8100 to schedule an appointment.

Rules to Get Fit and Avoid Injuries this Spring Season for Runners

Spring-RunnerAs we thaw from this winter’s frost, our bodies will need to acclimate to warmer weather once again. The warmth of spring is upon us, and once again it’s time to start gearing up for a refreshing change to the winter routines that have kept us cooped up with muscles creaking.

Even if you managed to remain active through trips to the gym; the prospect of getting outside and in the sun offers a range of new exercises that require preparation and training. You may ask, “if I have maintained my exercises, why would I need any extra preparation?” The answer is that it’s specifically at the start of these new exercises that your body is most prone to injury.

As runners, think about the varied terrain and urban obstacles of jogging outdoors versus the treadmill’s regularity; now apply that same comparison to every gym exercise and the variables of its outdoor equivalent, from biking in the park to soccer on the grass.

The following are three important steps you should take to ensure that getting back into shape leaves you free from injury while offering the most beneficial takeaway of getting back into shape for spring.

1) Take a moment to set a goal. Setting a goal helps propel yourself towards a specific aim, a simple enough idea which cannot be understated in its power to focus yourself on a reasonable achievement.

2) Renew one of your new year’s resolutions or challenge yourself to meet or beat a pace that you haven’t quite kept up with over the past few years.

3) More importantly, set up a log book to keep track of your times and achievements. Having a physical record of where you started with a means to your ends is paramount to meeting your goal.

Speaking of physical reminders, the change in season is the perfect opportunity to change your sneakers! Most dedicated running stores offer in-depth analyses of your feet and gait to make sure that you get the proper equipment. Think about marking your shoes with the date of purchase so you can keep tabs on when you got them so that you don’t keep using them after their time is up.

Dr. Mark Reed states, “With so many different running styles gaining popularity; selecting the shoe that fits your style is important. A properly fitted shoe will help protect against injury and may also enhance performance. “

You should also set up an appointment with your OSS physician to go over all the requisites, making sure to get the OK for the goals you’ve set for yourself before the start of new routines.

The simple act of updating your equipment and evaluating your physiology are powerful motivators for getting back in shape and keeping you injury free.

If you believe you are suffering from a running-related injury and need specialized orthopedic care, Orthopedic Specialists of Seattle provide excellent treatment options available for you. Please feel free to contact OSS at (206) 633-8100 to schedule an appointment.