1st MTP Cheilectomy: 1st Post-op

  1. You may shower tonight, letting soapy water run over your incision(s) and patting them dry with a towel. You should avoid submerging the leg (bath, pool, hot tub, etc.) for at least one week.
  2. Continue to perform passive range of motion exercises of the great toe, at least twice per day.
    • Using your fingers, rapidly alternate between up and down for 2-3 minutes.
    • Slowly push to extremes of motion, holding for a 5-count. As your discomfort and sensitivity decrease, you may use the floor to push off for greater range of motion.
  3. You may wean out of the post-op shoe and back into regular supportive shoes as your swelling and scar sensitivity allows. Most patients are transitioning back into regular shoes at around 3-4 weeks post-op, but you may begin as tolerated.
  4. Use a dressing or a thick sock to prevent the post-op shoe from rubbing on the incision.
  5. Once you have returned to regular shoes, you may increase activities in a step-wise fashion.
    • I would like you to first become comfortable with activities of daily living before reintroducing straight-line, low-impact activities (walking, bicycling, or working out on the elliptical trainer).
    • Once you are comfortable at this level, you may then reintroduce higher-impact, straight-line activities (jogging and running).
    • The final step will be the addition of activities involving lateral movement and uneven ground.
  6. Continue to ice and elevate as needed.
  7. In 2 weeks, you may begin applying a scar cream (vitamin E based, such as Mederma) or silicone sheets.
  8. Physical therapy is not typically required, but can be initiated as soon as 2 weeks post-op if needed or desired.
  9. I would like to see you back in 4 weeks for your next follow-up appointment.
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About Mark Reed

Mark Reed, MD Dr. Mark Reed is a board-certified orthopedic surgeon providing specialty care of all foot and ankle disorders. He treats both adolescents and adults with a special focus on sports-related injuries, including ankle instability, cartilage lesions, and Achilles tendon injuries.